Fear and Love

I do not fear
To walk the lonely road
Which leads far out into the sullen night
Nor do I fear the rebel
Wind tossed sea that stretches onward
Far beyond the night of human lands or human loves
It is the brooding, sharp-thorned discontent I fear
The nagging days without a second song
The sunlit noon of ease
The burden of delight and flattery
It is the hate touched soul I dread
The joyless heart
The unhappy faces in the streets
The smouldering fires of unforgiven slights
These I do fear
Not nights
Nor surging seas
Nor rebel hands

But heart unlovely and unloved

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The Diplodocus seen around the world

EXTINCT MONSTERS

1st cast in spot of honor The first cast of the Carnegie Diplodocus holds court at London’s Natural History Museum. Source

The story of Andrew Carnegie’s Diplodocus will surely be well known to most readers. As the legend goes, Carnegie the millionaire philanthropist saw a cartoon in the November 1898 New York Journal depicting a sauropod dinosaur peering into the window of a skyscraper. He immediately contacted the paleontology department at the newly established Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, and offered ample funding to find a sauropod skeleton for display. So began a frantic competition among the United States’ large urban museums to be the first to collect and mount a sauropod – the bigger the better.

The American Museum of Natural History was first across the finish line, unveiling their composite “Brontosaurus” in February of 1905. By that time, the Carnegie team had already found a sauropod skeleton of their own, a Diplodocus

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A Romeo and Juliet love story from Iraq

Evil Reporter Chick

Mike and me in Baghdad in early April, 2006. He believed in love. I wonder if he still does. Mike and me in Baghdad in April, 2006. He believed in love. I wonder if he still does.

I met Mike when sectarian strife exploded in Baghdad in 2006. That was not his real name, of course, but it was what he went by in his job as a translator for American soldiers.

Mike and I spent several evenings chatting at a coffee shop on the vast Camp Liberty complex. He was a smart well-spoken man with Antonio Banderas looks. He told me about his life in Iraq before the war. He taught computer science at a small Baghdad college and ran a photo processing shop.

He told me about the hope he’d held in 2003 after the ouster of Saddam, after which he worked as a security guard for Kellogg, Brown & Root. Eventually he found a job as an interpreter for the U.S. Army.

But things did not progress…

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Facebook Ruined My Life, Now They Must Pay

Peg-o-Leg's Ramblings

Should a ginormous corporation be allowed to humiliate a child and profit from her pain? Could $167,000,000 in compensation even begin to make up for her suffering? We can only hope so.

I give you, Exhibit A

Oh, the humanity Oh, the humanity

What’s the first thing you notice about this picture? (Besides the vast number of people piled onto 2 chairs.) Your eyes are drawn to the child on the right.

She sits alone. Two skinned knees are proof of a life spent tripping and bumping into coffee tables, and it’s not hard to see why.  Her cats-eyes glasses hint at the weak eyes beneath, while her chubby body attests to a complete lack of athletic skills. Her hand-me-down dress is so short the viewer can practically see both London AND France. From the top of her head (uneven hack-job on too-short bangs) to the soles of her feet (in black knee-socks…

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